Tag Archive: temptation

Chanukah! Thanksgiving! The Calories Are Coming, The Calories Are Coming! Run For Your Lives!

Don’t Panic!

 

After discussing how to survive the constant barrage of unhealthy high-calorie foods that seem to incessantly invade our environment, we’re now faced with a double whammy: eight days of Chanukah AND Thanksgiving, all rolled into one! Classic! I think this would be a good opportunity, therefore, to discuss how best to handle the upcoming holidays vis-à-vis the expected caloric overload.

 

Let’s start with what will happen.  You are going to treat yourself to a donut (doughnut?) or latka, and perhaps even two; and you are going to enjoy a Thanksgiving meal with friends and/or family. These are good things; this is how it should be. What you shouldn’t do is a) think that eating 2,000 or even 3,000 calories in a single sitting won’t affect you; b) think that you can work off the surplus calories the day after by running a marathon; or c) worry about overindulging to the point where your enjoyment of the festivities is compromised.

 

So, what to do, what do to? How to reconcile the inevitable onslaught?

 

I don’t believe it’s realistic to avoid or deny such temptations, nor do I think it’s healthy to do so. However, enjoying yourself doesn’t necessarily mean opening the floodgates either. Instead, it means ‘preparation beforehand’; ‘discipline, thought and enjoyment during’; and ‘control and appreciation afterwards’:

 

PREPARATION BEFOREHAND: Don’t come home from work to light the Chanukah candles, ravenous and willing to eat every donut or latka within arms’ reach the moment you finish singing Maoz Tzur. Instead, make sure you eat a snack in the late afternoon to ‘take the edge off’ before you come home. Feel free to have a Chanukah treat, but only after eating a healthy supper loaded with stomach-filling vegetables; you’ll eat less unhealthy food afterwards. Similarly, don’t start the Thanksgiving dinner on a totally empty stomach. I know its counter intuitive (why would you eat before you eat in order to eat less?), but even drinking a large glass of water before a meal will help keep your hunger at bay long enough for you to eat more mindfully. Which brings me to…

 

DISCIPLINE, THOUGHT AND ENJOYMENT DURING: Always eat mindfully. Know why you’re eating the food you’re eating, and have a sense of how much food you need. Eat for fuel, not for fun. Eat slowly, purposefully, and with kavanah. Make a bracha like you mean it, and appreciate every bite. If you’ve ever watched a small child enjoy a cookie, you’ll know what I mean; they don’t eat the cookie, they experience the cookie. Appreciate every mouthful in the moment, and stop thinking of the next bite before you’ve even finished chewing the last.

 

CONTROL AND APPRECIATION AFTERWARDS: That doesn’t mean you shouldn’t have dessert, but know that you’re eating dessert for enjoyment, not because you’re hungry; if you’re hungry, eat food that’s nutritious. Feel free to eat anything you like, but always in moderation. Finally, know when to say ‘enough’; animals don’t overeat in their natural environment, and nor should you. Gluttony is a sin, pure and simple.

 

 

Try 20-45 minutes of moderate to vigorous exercise (cardio intervals are excellent) within an hour before the big meal; this will increase your metabolism, minimizing the caloric surplus, and shuttle the nutrients in the food to where they’re needed, not to your waistline. You can also exercise after the meal, waiting 30-90 minutes to allow for digestion.

 

Finally, if you do find you’ve eaten more than you should have, try to eat less and exercise more the remainder of the day. If you accidently dropped your phone on the ground, you wouldn’t think of jumping up and down on it just because you slipped up once – we all make bad decisions from time to time, don’t throw good money after bad, don’t pick at the wound…dress it, and move on with your life.

 

Prepare beforehand; enjoy in moderation and with appreciation; and always thank Hashem for the amazing gifts of good food and good health. What better time to do so then now, during Chanukah and Thanksgiving?

 

No More Excuses – Part II: Surrounded By Nosh

More Reasons Not To Give Up

 

Last post I discussed that having a lack of time and a lack of support can be two reasons why it’s sometimes difficult to reach our health and fitness goals. This week, I’d like to examine another common excuse, and see if we can’t, instead, use it as a tool to help us achieve our objectives.

 

SURROUNDED BY NOSH AT HOME/WORK: Pizza day at work? Your co-worker decides to treat the whole office to the leftovers from their weekend birthday party? Your spouse believes that always keeping packets of cookies on hand in the house is vital, just in case there’s a blackout? Here in the affluent west, we’re all surrounded by a continual barrage of alluring unhealthy indulgences. It’s so easy to make unwise choices, especially when everyone around us makes those same poor choices. So how can we fight the tide? How can we muster the self-control and discipline to “choose life”?

 

First of all, once you’ve made the healthy decision to make healthier decisions, and have stocked up on more nutritious alternatives, make a clean sweep of your kitchen and pantry (and anywhere else you may have a ‘stash’). All you need to do after that is stop walking down the cookie aisle in the supermarket. Does that mean you’ll never eat another cookie or piece of cake again? No, of course not, nor should it be, and we’ll discuss more about that in a subsequent issue, but for now, simply know that it’s far more challenging to make better food choices when familiar temptations continue to be so readily available.

 

One of the biggest excuses I hear regarding people’s ‘questionable’ food choices is “there was nothing else to eat”, especially if you’re in unfamiliar surroundings; well that’s easy enough to change: Think ahead. Always think ahead, always have healthful foods with you, or at the very least, healthier alternatives to the more deleterious enticements we’re all inevitably faced with from time to time. Don’t wait until you’re hungry before wondering what there is to eat; inevitably, the only foods that are easily obtainable in those pivotal instances are not ideal, to say the least. Instead, plan ahead and prevent the ‘surprise’ of ‘having’ to have an unhealthy snack. I suggest preparing your meals in advance, several at a time in separate containers that you can grab from the fridge whenever you need them. Before you go out, even if you’re not hungry at that moment, grab an apple or a handful of nuts for later, just in case there aren’t any healthy alternatives at your destination. 

 

Finally, learn to say ‘no’; don’t give in to social or familial pressure. Admittedly, we’re all affected by foods differently; so ultimately, you must make the right choices for your own body. For some people, though, sugar and fat can feel just as addictive as drugs; a fact that is sometimes difficult to comprehend by those people who don’t share those same intense cravings.

 

At the end of the day, then, only you can control what goes into your mouth; it is only your own reflection with which you must contend. You are stronger than that piece of cake.